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DemocracyNow!

"Most Important Issue for Most People": Split on Healthcare Continues to Define 2020 Race
Author: mail@democracynow.org (Democracy Now!)

Healthcare continues to be a central issue of the Democratic nomination fight, with Senators Bernie Sanders and Elizabeth Warren repeating their calls for Medicare for All on the debate stage Wednesday night while their rivals proposed more incremental approaches.

We continue our roundtable discussion on Wednesday’s Democratic debate in Nevada. Our guests are Katrina vanden Heuvel, editorial director and publisher of The Nation, America’s oldest weekly magazine, and a columnist for WashingtonPost.com; journalist and activist Raquel Willis, executive editor of Out magazine, who has endorsed Senator Elizabeth Warren for president; Ana María Archila, co-executive director of the Center for Popular Democracy, a progressive advocacy group that has endorsed Senator Bernie Sanders; Annise Parker, the former mayor of Houston, now president of the Victory Fund, which works to increase the number of openly LGBTQ officials in government and has endorsed Pete Buttigieg for president.

Bloomberg Takes Debate Stage for First Time & Struggles to Face His History of Misogyny, Racism
Author: mail@democracynow.org (Democracy Now!)

Tensions flared at the ninth Democratic presidential debate in Las Vegas on Wednesday. Senator Bernie Sanders sought to defend his position as front-runner in the Democrats’ nomination fight, and former Vice President Joe Biden, former Mayor Pete Buttigieg and Senator Amy Klobuchar tried to attract more supporters. Senator Elizabeth Warren led a night full of attacks on the new person on stage: billionaire former New York City Mayor Mike Bloomberg. Bloomberg faced questions about his vast wealth, his defense of stop-and-frisk and his treatment of women.

We host a roundtable on the debate and Saturday’s Nevada caucuses: Katrina vanden Heuvel is editorial director and publisher of The Nation, America’s oldest weekly magazine, and a columnist for WashingtonPost.com; journalist and activist Raquel Willis is executive editor of Out magazine, as well as a supporter of Senator Elizabeth Warren; Ana María Archila is co-executive director of the Center for Popular Democracy, a progressive advocacy group that has endorsed Senator Bernie Sanders; Annise Parker is the former mayor of Houston, now president of the Victory Fund, which works to increase the number of openly LGBTQ officials in government and has endorsed Pete Buttigieg for president. The Victory Fund is the largest LGBTQ political action committee in the United States.

Headlines for February 20, 2020
Author: mail@democracynow.org (Democracy Now!)

NYT Politics

Las Vegas Doesn’t Disappoint
Author: Lisa Lerer
Who knew there could be so much drama in Sin City? Here’s our debate recap.
These Students Are Learning About Fake News and How to Spot It
Author: Alina Tugend
News literacy instruction is flourishing in the wake of the 2016 election as worries about fake news grow.
Who Won the Democratic Debate? Experts Weigh In
Author: Maggie Astor
In the last few presidential debates, there was little consensus on a clear winner or loser. That changed on Wednesday night.
Jean Daniel, Leading French Journalist and Humanist, Dies at 99
Author: Robert D. McFadden
In 1963, Mr. Daniel went to Cuba at the behest of President John F. Kennedy to explore with Fidel Castro the possibility of a rapprochement.
Inside the Push to Turn Out Latino Voters in Nevada
Author: Isabella Grullón Paz
Campaigns and organizations are trying to build a robust Latino voter base in Nevada. Will it work?
Judge in Roger Stone Trial Confronts a High-Pressure Decision
Author: Sharon LaFraniere
President Trump has attacked the case and the judge as biased. She seems unlikely to be ruffled.

Portland Tribune

Can old wounds from Oregon's timber wars be healed?
Author: Sam Stites/Oregon Capital Bureau
Landmark deal between timber, environmentalists hinges on aerial spraying legislation, but cap-and-trade woes could blow up the deal if Republicans walk

SALEM – The deal announced last week was intended to end the war in the woods that has beset Oregon forestry issues for decades.

But not everyone is cheering ...

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