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Portland Tribune

$50,000 Powerball ticket set to expire on Nov. 21
Author: Phil Hawkins
Winning ticket was sold in Aurora on Nov. 20, 2018, but prize has yet to be claimed

A $50,000 Powerball ticket sold in Aurora last year is set to expire if it is not claimed by Nov. 21.

The ticket, purchased on Nov. 20, 2018 with the winning numbers of 07-14-23-38-55-18, ...

What's ahead for Oregon State?
Author: Portland Tribune
Kerry Eggers' latest sports podcast features Beavers talk with OSU broadcasters Jim Wilson, Ron Callan

Oregon State has a decent chance to win two more games and qualify for a bowl game for the first time since 2013.

That's the opinion of Beaver broadcasters Jim Wilson and Ron Callan, guests of ...

Bullets strike child's bed in Stark Street shooting
Author: Pamplin Media Group
Portland Police say the suspects were intending to strike a nearby vehicle, but the gunfire also hit apartments.

Portland Police continue to investigate a Friday night shooting that sent bullets into a child's bedroom.

The Gun Violence Reduction Team says the suspect or suspects were targeting a vehicle in the ...

Portland-area hospitals have Trillium in a bind
Author: Nick Budnick
For-profit health care giant's subsidiary may lose out on state contract to serve low-income people in Portland area

Local hospital and health systems have won an early bureaucratic skirmish in their fight against a for-profit health giant attempting to provide health-care to low-income residents of greater Portland.

Now it may be ...

$50,000 Powerball ticket set to expire on Nov. 21
Author: Phil Hawkins
Winning ticket was sold in Aurora on Nov. 20, 2018, but prize has yet to be claimed

A $50,000 Powerball ticket sold in Aurora last year is set to expire if it is not claimed by Nov. 21.

The ticket, purchased on Nov. 20, 2018 with the winning numbers of 07-14-23-38-55-18, ...

What's ahead for Oregon State?
Author: Portland Tribune
Kerry Eggers' latest sports podcast features Beavers talk with OSU broadcasters Jim Wilson, Ron Callan

Oregon State has a decent chance to win two more games and qualify for a bowl game for the first time since 2013.

That's the opinion of Beaver broadcasters Jim Wilson and Ron Callan, guests of ...

Bullets strike child's bed in Stark Street shooting
Author: Pamplin Media Group
Portland Police say the suspects were intending to strike a nearby vehicle, but the gunfire also hit apartments.

Portland Police continue to investigate a Friday night shooting that sent bullets into a child's bedroom.

The Gun Violence Reduction Team says the suspect or suspects were targeting a vehicle in the ...

Oregon doctor accused of implanting 100+ unnecessary pacemakers
Author: Nick Budnick
Cardiology nurse in La Grande blew whistle on allegations; Doctor also worked in Portland, Beaverton and Hillsboro.

A recently unsealed federal whistleblower lawsuit claimed that a longtime Portland-area cardiologist, Emilia Arden, implanted more than 100 patients with unnecessary pacemakers at Grande Ronde Hospital in eastern Oregon.

The whistleblower dropped the case ...

Seismic retrofitting: Are homeowners getting ripped off?
Author: KOIN 6 News
Residential seismic retrofitting is unregulated and only requires a rudimentary sketch for a county or city building inspector to sign off on the work that can costs thousands

Some homeowners are not getting what they think they are paying for when having their homes seismically retrofitted to protect against a giant ...

Columbian Newspaper

Trump impeachment inquiry heads for live TV
Author: Associated Press

Back in 1973, tens of millions of Americans tuned in to what Variety called “the hottest daytime soap opera” — the Senate Watergate hearings that eventually led to President Richard Nixon’s resignation.

It was a communal experience, and by some estimates, more than 80 percent of Americans tuned in to at least part of the Watergate telecasts. They were offered by ABC, CBS and NBC, as well as PBS, which won acclaim and viewers by showing not only the live hearings but also the full-length replays in prime time.

Seeing the witnesses lay out the case against the president moved public opinion decidedly in favor of impeachment.

But this time may be different.

When the House impeachment inquiry of President Donald Trump begins its public phase on Wednesday, people will be watching on screens large and small. Many, in fact, are likely to be watching the proceedings on more than one screen, with real-time reinforcement of their preexisting views of Trump on social media platforms and other venues that did not exist in Nixon’s time.

In the Watergate era, there was no Fox News or nationally prominent conservative talk radio shows, which today are favored by many of Trump’s supporters. Nor was there the equivalent of MSNBC, which caters to left-of-center partisans.

“People now have a far greater variety of options as to how to consume this,” said professor Tobe Berkovitz, a former political media consultant who teaches communications at Boston University.

“Everyone might watch the same hearing, but then people are going to divide into camps in terms of how they want to engage with the analysis,” he said. “You’re going to pick who you want to interpret and propagandize.”

Two decades before Watergate, Americans had their first collective immersion in live telecasts of a high-stakes Washington hearing when Sen. Joseph McCarthy, R-Wis., polarized the country with his relentless pursuit of suspected communist sympathizers. Joseph Welch, a lawyer representing the Army, is remembered to this day for his question to McCarthy in 1954: “Have you no sense of decency, sir?”

The Watergate hearings produced a comparably memorable catchphrase, when Sen. Howard Baker, R-Tenn., summarized the gist of the complex inquiry into a politically motivated break-in: “What did the president know and when did he know it?” A damning answer eventually surfaced after the Select Committee on Presidential Campaign Activities, as the Senate’s Watergate Committee was officially called, obtained secret Oval Office tapes that implicated Nixon in a cover-up.

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