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Portland Tribune

Killing of family shocks area residents
Author: Justin Much
UPDATE: Suspect and deceased victims in 'horrific' incident are identified, two injured victims are hopsitalized.

Local residents are still shocked over the news that a man killed four people, including an infant, before being shot to death by Clackamas County deputies inside a South Barlow Road home late Saturday night.

Among ...

Killing of family shocks area residents
Author: Justin Much
UPDATE: Suspect and deceased victims in 'horrific' incident are identified, two injured victims are hopsitalized.

Local residents are still shocked over the news that a man killed four people, including an infant, before being shot to death by Clackamas County deputies inside a South Barlow Road home late Saturday night.

Among ...

Beavers' Rueck: 'Huge strides' still ahead
Author: Kerry Eggers
BY KERRY EGGERS/PORTLAND TRIBUNE/Injury-plagued OSU women will have to get back up, improve inside after dropping knock-down, drag-out game with ASU

CORVALLIS — Oregon State wasn't going to go through its Pac-12 season undefeated.

So a 79-76 loss to Arizona State in double overtime Sunday at Gill Coliseum was neither a ...

Beavers' Rueck: 'Huge strides' still ahead
Author: Kerry Eggers
BY KERRY EGGERS/PORTLAND TRIBUNE/Injury-plagued OSU women will have to get back up, improve inside after dropping knock-down, drag-out game with ASU

CORVALLIS — Oregon State wasn't going to go through its Pac-12 season undefeated.

So a 79-76 loss to Arizona State in double overtime Sunday at Gill Coliseum was neither a ...

Portland Business News

New OHSU vaccine shows promise against malaria
Author: Elizabeth Hayes
The vaccine was still stimulating an immune response in infected monkeys a year after it was administered.

Columbian Newspaper

Police: 5 fatally shot inside Florida bank, suspect arrested
Author: Associated Press

SEBRING, Fla. — A gunman opened fire inside a Florida bank Wednesday afternoon, killing five people before surrendering to negotiators, police said.

Zephen Xaver, 21, was arrested after the shooting at a Sebring SunTrust Bank branch, Sebring police Chief Karl Hoglund said at a news conference.

“Today’s been a tragic day in our community,” Hogland said. “We’ve suffered significant loss at the hands of a senseless criminal doing a senseless crime.”

The victims were not immediately identified.

A man called police dispatch Wednesday afternoon to report that he had fired shots inside the bank, Hoglund said. Initial negotiations to get the barricaded man to leave the bank were unsuccessful, so the Highlands County Sheriff’s Office SWAT team entered the bank to continue negotiations, and the man eventually surrendered.

Police didn’t say what charges Xaver would face or indicate a motive.

Gov. Ron DeSantis was in the region for an infrastructure tour and traveled to Sebring after news of the shooting broke. He said the Florida Department of Law Enforcement would assist Sebring police and the Highlands sheriff in any way possible.

“Obviously, this is an individual who needs to face very swift and exacting justice,” DeSantis said of the gunman.

SunTrust Chairman and CEO Bill Rogers released a statement saying the bank is deeply saddened by the tragic shooting.

“We are working with officials and dedicating ourselves to fully addressing the needs of all the individuals and families involved,” Rogers said. “Our entire team mourns this terrible loss.”

Man charged in Boston kidnapping sent for mental evaluation
Author: Associated Press

BOSTON — A man charged with kidnapping a 23-year-old woman in Boston sobbed in court Wednesday as he was ordered to undergo a mental health evaluation.

Victor Pena is accused of holding Olivia Ambrose against her will in his apartment, where police found her on Tuesday. Ambrose had been missing since Saturday, and police said she appeared to be in good health.

Pena, 38, will be held without bail and will be sent to a state hospital for a 20-day competency evaluation.

Joseph Perullo, an attorney for Pena, said after the hearing that it’s too early to comment on the specifics of the case, but Perullo said he’s happy that Ambrose is back home with her family.

Ambrose vanished Saturday night after leaving a bar near Faneuil Hall in downtown Boston, where she had been with her twin sister and friends.

Boston Police Commissioner William Gross said surveillance footage captured the man holding Ambrose later that night, and it was clear “she did not go along willingly.”

Ambrose told police that Pena took her phone, according to court documents. At one point, Ambrose managed to get her phone back and send text messages to her mother, they say.

When police entered Pena’s apartment, Ambrose was crying and had a “horrified look on her face,” the documents said.

A court psychologist who examined Pena Wednesday said he expressed “bizarre” behavior and “did not appear to know why he was in court today,” The Boston Globe reported .

Pena’s older brother told the newspaper that he believes there was a misunderstanding, calling his brother a “little bit mentally challenged.” Jose Pena said his brother is a hoarder and told him in a call from jail that Ambrose was cleaning his apartment for him.

“Him kidnapping her, I’m 100 percent sure he didn’t,” Jose Pena said.

Victor Pena was arrested at Rhode Island’s Twin River Casino in July on charges of cheating and obtaining money under false pretenses.

He was also accused in 2013 of violating a restraining order that his ex-girlfriend took out against him, documents say. The charge was ultimately dropped.

Kentucky school comes under fire after Washington incident
Author: ADAM BEAM and BRUCE SCHREINER, Associated Press

PARK HILLS, Ky. — Less than a week ago, Covington Catholic High School was known mostly for its seven state titles in football and its rousing motto, “A spirit that will not die.”

By Tuesday, its phones had been shut off, its website and social media accounts had gone dark, police cars were barricading its entrances, and classes were canceled along with a basketball game as the overwhelmingly white, all-boys school found itself a symbol of the nation’s deep divisions over race, class and culture.

The transformation began with an online video that appeared to show a group of Covington Catholic boys in “Make American Great Again” hats mocking a Native American protester as he beat a ceremonial drum at the Lincoln Memorial in Washington on Friday. Subsequent videos showed a more complicated three-way confrontation, involving a cluster of men calling themselves the Black Hebrew Israelites who hurled insults at the boys and the Native Americans.

“People saw the original video and took an early side, and they are just not budging from that side,” said Hayden Bode, who graduated from Covington Catholic last year and was part of a small group who came to the Roman Catholic Diocese of Covington on Tuesday to support the students.

In the wake of the incident, parents, alumni and others have rallied to the school’s defense, with many changing their social media profiles to say things like “I stand with Covington Catholic High School.” Others, though, have gone on the attack against the 586-student school, situated just outside Covington in Park Hills.

Sarah Buckley, who attended an all-girls Catholic school across the street, played in the band at athletic events and graduated in 2013, said Covington Catholic has “a culture of entitlement, of machismo, of masculinity.”

“I witnessed people from Covington Catholic saying homophobic slurs, some saying racist things,” she said. “They would say misogynistic comments, and it was just accepted within the culture there.”

Nick Sandmann, the Covington Catholic student seen smiling in the videos as he stood face-to-face with Native American activist Nathan Phillips, has said he heard no one from the school chant anything hateful. He told NBC’s “Today” show on Wednesday that he wasn’t disrespectful and that he has nothing to apologize for. Sandmann said he isn’t racist and neither are his classmates.

But Phillips said he heard students shout, “Build that wall!” and “Go back to the reservation!” And some were seen on video making the tomahawk-chop gesture.

Both Sandmann and Phillips have said they were trying to keep the peace in a volatile situation.

As Covington Catholic reopened Wednesday under the watch of law enforcement after calling off classes Tuesday because of threats of violence, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell blamed “far-left activists” and the media for the attacks on the students.

“Far-left activists and members of the national and state media isolated a very few seconds of video footage from any shred of context and many decided it was time to attack and denigrate these young people,” the Kentucky Republican said.

On Tuesday, a photo circulated on social media showing students at a 2011 Covington Catholic basketball game dressed all in black and wearing black paint on their bodies and faces as they yelled at a black player from an opposing school.

But the school’s defenders said there was nothing racial going on. Schools and colleges around the country have been known to hold “blackouts” or “whiteouts” to boost school spirit by getting fans to dress in that color, and some students go further by painting their faces.

Adam Fatkin, who played in the game for the opposing Clark County team, said in an email Wednesday that he never heard any racist remarks from the student section. He said his black teammate was being yelled at “simply because he was a player on the opposing team.”

Joe Nienaber, a 1989 Covington Catholic graduate and a county commissioner in Kenton County, where the school is situated, said the photo “totally misrepresents the culture” at the school. Nienaber said “nobody knows the story behind it,” and added: “I promise you, those people got talked to.”

Buckley, the Catholic girls’ school graduate, said “it’s not appropriate to ever do blackface,” and the students’ actions “fall upon the school.”

“Even if the students didn’t have any ill malice, that basically is like American History 101,” she said.

On Saturday, the Roman Catholic Diocese of Covington condemned the students’ actions and promised to take appropriate action “up to and including expulsion.” The strong statement upset many in the school’s orbit.

“There is a lot of folks who are upset at the diocese for not being as supportive as many alumni and parents of alumni have been,” said Adam Koenig, a Republican state representative who graduated from Covington Catholic in 1989.

The diocese issued a second statement on Tuesday, saying a “third-party investigation” will look into the “very serious matter that has already permanently altered the lives of many people.” It did not retract the previous criticism.

Covington Catholic opened in 1925. Students are required to log at least 60 hours of community service to graduate. Its notable alumni include Pat Cipollone, who is now White House counsel.

“They graduate a lot of the folks that end up the civic leaders of northern Kentucky,” said Chris McDaniel, a Republican state senator whose district includes the school.

John Schickel, another GOP state senator, called it “completely unfair” for the students “to be drug through the mud like this.” But he said it offered a teachable moment.

“This is the world we live in today and it’s not fair,” he said. “Their responsibility is to stand up for what’s true and what’s right.”

Beam reported from Frankfort, Kentucky.

Police called to shutdown protest at McConnell office
Author: Associated Press

LEXINGTON, Ky. — Police in Kentucky were called to a protest by a group of federal government workers at a field office for Sen. Mitch McConnell.

The protestors arrived at the Lexington office in hopes of handing off some letters to the senator’s staff about the government shutdown, said Chon Jung, an organizer. Jung said it was a “peaceful demonstration” though some protesters banged on windows of the office.

He said protesters agreed to leave the building when police arrived. McConnell was in Washington on Wednesday.

Lexington police spokeswoman Brenna Angel said about 50 protesters and media left without incident.

Jung, a retired law enforcement officer, said workers were at the office to “put some pressure on McConnell” to pass legislation to end the shutdown.

He said workers are feeling the pain of the shutdown that has dragged on for over a month.

“They’re hurting,” Jung said by phone from outside the field office.

The American Federation of Government Employees organized the protest to “highlight the effect this shutdown is having on our members, their families, and the nation,” according to a statement.

Workers from the Transportation Security Administration, the Department of Interior, the Census Bureau, and the Department of Veterans Affairs took part in Wednesday’s protest.

The U.S. Senate this week is set to vote on dueling proposals — a Republican one that would give Trump money for the wall and one from Democrats that would re-open government through Feb. 8, with no wall money, giving lawmakers time to talk about it.

Sanders says it’s laughable that White House is inaccessible
Author: Associated Press

NEW YORK — Following the apparent demise of the traditional afternoon briefing of reporters, White House Press Secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders calls any notion the Trump administration is not accessible to the press “absolutely laughable.”

She made the remark Wednesday on familiar turf — the morning show “Fox & Friends.”

Since the last White House press briefing on Dec. 18, she’s given six television interviews to Fox News Channel, one to “Fox News Sunday” on broadcast and one to “CBS This Morning.” That’s according to the networks and the lobbying group Media Matters for America.

But Sanders says she takes questions from reporters every day. The White House Correspondents Association has condemned the lack of scheduled briefings but notes that Sanders usually talks to reporters after her Fox live shots.

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